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Profile [AF>Amis des Lapins]CeDriCXD
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Message 2217 - Posted: 11 Jan 2014 | 20:31:06 UTC
Last modified: 11 Jan 2014 | 20:33:58 UTC

Chernobyl is not identified on the map of the project. However, the site is still potentially dangerous.
why the nuclear plant is not identified ?

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Message 2227 - Posted: 12 Jan 2014 | 11:35:19 UTC
Last modified: 12 Jan 2014 | 11:43:55 UTC

I would be somewhat surprised if there were even people living close enough to there, for volunteers to be running their home computers, hence BOINC near the Chernobyl disaster. Given the severity of the disaster, the aftermath, and also the half life of uranium as well as plutonium; isn't the area still largely closed off to the public?

Someone living in, or near the former Soviet area, could probably fill you in more on the situation. But I'd rather expect a bit of a quarantine, around the area. If no volunteers run computers there, then there would be no detectors from this project, on site...

I'd imagine that others are monitoring the situation, and have already taken periodic readings there, to have a sense of exactly what the radiation levels are, both from the natural decay rate, and also any cleanup efforts attempted, as well as any dilution of radioactivity from rainfall and what not, that could move sediment/material "down stream" or whatever? 30 years, give or take, is a drop in the bucket against the half life of materials like U-238 though... The site of the Chernobyl reactor could remain dangerous health wise for any prolonged exposure, beyond our own lifetimes, would be the sense I have...

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Message 2230 - Posted: 12 Jan 2014 | 17:42:49 UTC

I suspect that only active plants are shown.

Cheers,

Al.

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Profile [AF>Amis des Lapins]CeDriCXD
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Message 2231 - Posted: 12 Jan 2014 | 18:13:07 UTC - in response to Message 2230.
Last modified: 12 Jan 2014 | 18:26:22 UTC

I suspect that only active plants are shown.

Cheers,

Al.


No no no... look at this picture.

Profile [AF>Libristes>Jip] otax
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Message 2235 - Posted: 12 Jan 2014 | 20:49:23 UTC
Last modified: 12 Jan 2014 | 20:50:09 UTC

And this one too ...

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Message 2244 - Posted: 13 Jan 2014 | 14:47:50 UTC - in response to Message 2235.

The list of plants was created by me from existing Internet resources and was up to date on time of creating and date of source documents.
I really doesn't had a time to check every single one and do batch import to database.
Obviously I can update state if I get signal from you (with proper data e.g. date of closing) but this required access to database as I didn't make any front-end...
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Message 2367 - Posted: 21 Feb 2014 | 2:59:22 UTC

Oh great! I was looking around hoping to find something on this topic as I wanted some info to get updated.

Crystal River-3 in Florida, USA is down and about to start its decommissioning process. It is now owned by Duke Energy who bought Progress Energy who before that botched a repair job at the plant and FUBAR it. Decommissioning will take about 20 years. So there it is. That is what I wanted to get someone to update.


What a nice way to go out don't you think?. Damage a multi-million (billion?) dollar facility and trick another energy company to buy you out. Duke energy already said that they were not going to replace it with a new Nuclear power plant. Floridians are stuck with the bill for both decommissioning and paying for a new natural gas powered plant to replace the power lost in our electric system while Duke energy continues to collect money that was intended to build a future new Nuclear power plant which they have also said that they will not build either.

And I am still waiting for solar to become the norm in our state. I think I wont see that in my lifetime, and I am 35.

What a joke these power utility companies are. Can't believe that laws in our state allow them to do that.

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Message 2376 - Posted: 24 Feb 2014 | 6:47:05 UTC - in response to Message 2367.

What a nice way to go out don't you think?. Damage a multi-million (billion?) dollar facility and trick another energy company to buy you out.


Sadly, that's all too common in the markets. It wasn't that many years ago that Bank of America got caught with it's pants down, mind you after they (and other banks) received a bail out. You see, with the corporate merger that took place with Countrywide Financial, they picked up Countrywide's bad mortgages that had fallen into default.

So BofA's answer was to package up those bum mortgages, and sell them off like commodities, knowing full well that they were a loss for which they'd never collect the debt due. They sold several of those bum mortgages back onto the tax payer, aka selling them off to the US Treasury Dept, and sold other bad/defaulted mortgages off to AIG who took them to court and sued them on that account. In any case, the tax payers who were obliged to bail them out, got a lump of coal in return...

Little surprises me anymore, especially in the world of politics and finance (especially when the 2, come together)...

And I am still waiting for solar to become the norm in our state. I think I wont see that in my lifetime, and I am 35.


Solar has it's uses, though and all said I don't necessarily see it fully replacing other forms of electric production, perhaps with the exception of the Sahara desert, and places like Arizona... Aside from night, where electric usage can also be higher for many residential communities, as people are home late at night, cloudy days also pose a limit. No sun, no light to collect. Seasons can also effect this, as winter has shorter days then summer...

Usually one wants a mix of energy sources, where wind and solar can somewhat play against each other's limitations (cloudy days can also tend to be windy, if one's dealing with storm clouds blocking the sun. On the other hand, clear, non-stormy days, would tend to have more sun).

Things like nuclear can be a constant generation, where weather for instance isn't effecting the energy output. This leaves solar as more of an additional source. Some areas, like New Jersey are also getting a bit creative, putting solar panels on utility polls around the state, allowing the power generation to proceed along all the power lines which also carry the electricity about. But even still, and even with these additions, there's also a look for plants that can provide a steady supply of energy to the system, while these can add some additional power to the grid...

What a joke these power utility companies are. Can't believe that laws in our state allow them to do that.


It's all around. These utility companies are legal monopolies, who's monopoly control is sanctioned by government. If one isn't happy with their electric utility, the only way to change it, is to move. This also allows companies to do what PSE&G pulled here in New Jersey.

Basically, they didn't bother to trim the trees from the power lines, and also by NJ state law, no other tree, logging, or landscaping service is permitted to trim near the power lines. So when Sandy hit, well of course the power went out. So PSE&G petitioned the public utilities commission to raise all our electric rates, largely because they neglected the clearing of tree branches before the storm. This, not withstanding that NJ's electric rates at 18 cents per KW/hr is higher then almost any state in the country to begin with (HI being the most notable exception, as they were about 24 cents per KW/hr.

Not surprisingly though, the state also used the same hurricane as an excuse to raise the tolls on the road, claiming lost revenue due to the hurricane (fewer travelers were using the roads during the hurricane) as an excuse to recoup "lost revenue" by raising tolls...

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