Posts by Toby Broom

11) Message boards : Science : Yes I know, ignorant question but.... (Message 912)
Posted 4410 days ago by Toby Broom
You could detect the same gamma ray twice as you say ther certinally have enough engery.

When it collides with the first atom the new gamma ray would be emitted at a different angle to the old one, so it would be tough to line up the detectors so you could catch the 2.

12) Message boards : Science : Yes I know, ignorant question but.... (Message 909)
Posted 4410 days ago by Toby Broom
I think if you put them next to each other then they'll read the same. Like when you look in the sky on a clear day it's just blue everywhere.

When the gamma ray hits the molecules in the tube then it loses some or all of it's energy, so I think it would be hard and un-likly to get to the next detector.

So I think it's more like rain.

Having 2 next to each other is good as it helps to demostrate the hardware is working correctly and reliably.
13) Message boards : Cafe : Solar Flares (Message 906)
Posted 4410 days ago by Toby Broom
Actually it was the 27th, looks like Host 1503 did some testing too?
14) Message boards : Cafe : Solar Flares (Message 905)
Posted 4410 days ago by Toby Broom


The spike yesterday to me isn't significant.

The standard deviation of the data is 0.005mSv and the spike was 0.002mSv.

Whatever happened on 26th Feb was intresting?
15) Message boards : Science : Yes I know, ignorant question but.... (Message 903)
Posted 4410 days ago by Toby Broom
They can be any size, like a flood light or a laser.

Gamma ray are powerful to they can detected over long distances, you need 6cm of concrete to lower the intensity by half.

The Sv is in J/Kg so this takes in to account the number of events and strength.

There was a discussion about placement here:

http://radioactiveathome.org/boinc/forum_thread.php?id=24
16) Message boards : Science : Cant find my station (Message 895)
Posted 4411 days ago by Toby Broom
I think the run time is how much data it will log before uploading it to the server.

I don't know why they picked 1.3hrs?

If you ran 24hrs, there's a great chance of losing some data, I don't see why 24hrs would be better?
17) Message boards : Science : Another similar project (Message 890)
Posted 4411 days ago by Toby Broom
Just saw this

http://www.bunniestudios.com/blog/?p=2218
18) Message boards : Cafe : Solar Flares (Message 889)
Posted 4411 days ago by Toby Broom
The magnetosphere is what deflects the charged particles, this is way out from the earth so most are deflected there.

The average cosmic radation per year is 0.4mSv, per hr this is 45pSv, I'm detecting 0.1uSv/hr, so it would need to be a large ammount (million times?) over the average to be detected.

I think alot of the cosmic rays that enter the earth have enough engery to do things, they can transmute nitrogen to oxygen when a proton cosmic ray hits, this is enough to give out some gamma rays :)

I think they forcasted some more events so we'll see if they can publish the data it would be great.
19) Message boards : Cafe : Solar Flares (Message 887)
Posted 4411 days ago by Toby Broom
Yes, Gamma is EM, I'm sure some makes it through too, but it seems like not enough to make any differnces for me?

I think the detector would detect any rays as long as they were powerful enough, in the classic definition of x-ray, they tend to be lower power so less likly to be detected.

The solar flare is cosmic rays of charged particles, these are the more strongly deflected things so less likly to make it to the sensor.

Since the detector we have is tuned for gamma, I think it would be less sensative to cosmic rays?
20) Message boards : Cafe : Solar Flares (Message 885)
Posted 4411 days ago by Toby Broom
It would be good if the project could publish the average global radiation levels over time for this kind of event.

My sensor seems the same today as it was yesterday and the day before.

Reading the Wiki, seems like most of the flair would be charged partices that are deflected by the earths magnetic field. A smaller amount is EM radation, which again interacts with molecules in the atmosphere.


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