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Profile Ascholten
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Message 883 - Posted: 16 Mar 2012 | 23:02:32 UTC

I just got my detectors up and running today so missed the big show but, with th at. I wonder if anyone has their stuff set up outside or close to the window if you can detect any additional radiation from this solar storm we had?

I would think that with all the electromagnetic energy the sun is throwing at us during these things we should be able to pick up something, or maybe a 'wave' of energy?

Anyone see anything on their detectors?

Aaron
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Message 885 - Posted: 16 Mar 2012 | 23:59:26 UTC

It would be good if the project could publish the average global radiation levels over time for this kind of event.

My sensor seems the same today as it was yesterday and the day before.

Reading the Wiki, seems like most of the flair would be charged partices that are deflected by the earths magnetic field. A smaller amount is EM radation, which again interacts with molecules in the atmosphere.
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Message 886 - Posted: 17 Mar 2012 | 0:12:39 UTC - in response to Message 885.

But gamma is essentially EM right? Im sure the atmosphere would filter it somewhat but im fairly sure that some would get through too right?

I wonder if the detector detects X rays too, and / or cosmic rays?

Aaron
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Message 887 - Posted: 17 Mar 2012 | 1:02:48 UTC - in response to Message 886.
Last modified: 17 Mar 2012 | 1:03:18 UTC

Yes, Gamma is EM, I'm sure some makes it through too, but it seems like not enough to make any differnces for me?

I think the detector would detect any rays as long as they were powerful enough, in the classic definition of x-ray, they tend to be lower power so less likly to be detected.

The solar flare is cosmic rays of charged particles, these are the more strongly deflected things so less likly to make it to the sensor.

Since the detector we have is tuned for gamma, I think it would be less sensative to cosmic rays?

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Message 888 - Posted: 17 Mar 2012 | 1:09:20 UTC - in response to Message 887.

But if the cosmic ray / particle, once it hits the atmosphere and gets slowed down, might it shed some of it's energy as gamma? Im sure the atmosphere filters out most of it but Id think we might see some at least. Electrons need what 1mEV to shed X rays? I know once you start playing with DC over the 10KV range you are getting into a risk of x rays.

It will be interesting, if we get another solar 'event' Ill try to put my detector outside and see if we can see increase over the time the 'waves' are hitting us.

Aaron
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Message 889 - Posted: 17 Mar 2012 | 1:30:55 UTC

The magnetosphere is what deflects the charged particles, this is way out from the earth so most are deflected there.

The average cosmic radation per year is 0.4mSv, per hr this is 45pSv, I'm detecting 0.1uSv/hr, so it would need to be a large ammount (million times?) over the average to be detected.

I think alot of the cosmic rays that enter the earth have enough engery to do things, they can transmute nitrogen to oxygen when a proton cosmic ray hits, this is enough to give out some gamma rays :)

I think they forcasted some more events so we'll see if they can publish the data it would be great.
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Message 904 - Posted: 17 Mar 2012 | 15:57:47 UTC - in response to Message 889.
Last modified: 17 Mar 2012 | 15:58:02 UTC

I got an experimental script which extracts averages up to 31 days back. There are some fluctuations, however I'm not sure where do they come from. sample output is here 31 days - if it shows "No data" then not enough samples were taken (minimum is 6 hours).
Please note that Mar 3rd is bugged because someone tested the sensor without setting test flag.

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Message 905 - Posted: 17 Mar 2012 | 16:22:13 UTC
Last modified: 17 Mar 2012 | 16:26:51 UTC



The spike yesterday to me isn't significant.

The standard deviation of the data is 0.005mSv and the spike was 0.002mSv.

Whatever happened on 26th Feb was intresting?

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Message 906 - Posted: 17 Mar 2012 | 16:26:43 UTC

Actually it was the 27th, looks like Host 1503 did some testing too?

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Message 3659 - Posted: 21 Mar 2018 | 9:24:21 UTC

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Message 3660 - Posted: 21 Mar 2018 | 17:50:40 UTC - in response to Message 3659.

Tips Permainan Judi Sakong Spamtard


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